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20121104
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 199 (some duplicates have been removed)
done at department of technology and tough economic times and the fact of the matter is your department has been subjected to the lion's share of budget cuts we were forced to do and not asking departments to make similar cuts in their it situation and i think that is part of the tension and why we shouldn't know been able to make headway. you allude to the fact until you get direction from the top about need of centralization you had to form partnerships and you as the head of department of technology can't tell other heads to cooperate and you have to work out and partnership. one of the things that i wished the grand jury spent more time on. this is the trend we're seeing in agencies and governments around the country. by in large most governments have a growing decentralization and we know we're not doing that for everything but there are functions that need to be decentralized and we know there are successes here in california and the state is expected to save $3 billion. denver went through a great consolidation and saving millions of dollars. what are those entities doing that
down to partnerships and i think department of technology and cio and coit we spend time creating these partnerships and the consolidation project is a great one. i also want to acknowledge the airport and the emergency management center and we have a great partnership with. we have a great partnership with labor and reclassify it positions and training program whereas in the past it was done on a department by department basis so i think we're creating those partnerships for success, but i think at the end of the day it's a transitional challenge for the organization to go from thinking of itself as minicorporations as they view themselves at times in independent departments to work together as a cohesive unit. it just grew up. we started in the main frame days and monolithic and those terminals and pc revolution game and it was different overnight and everyone had a pc and the expert on how to work things so we are looking for a balance. we are bringing your own device to work and still balance that and what does it make sense to have centralized and do from a security confi
partners in the white house with waking up every single day thinking about how human technology has improved the lives of americans. you may think about... go to just picking up 20 percent of government or making more or providing efficiency in the government and doing lots of that. there are a lot more things happening across the board that were driving forward. but the important part of this is really thinking about outside of the government. how will we have an impact in the lives of americans in so many profound ways. and it is not only easy to connect the dots between how we are using technology inside government. and how we are fostering a culture of government going forward related to how young women are in the education program for science or technology and how are we creating jobs in this country and infrastructure and anything like that. so most importantly, how are we fostering innovation in this country, that america, uniquely is founded on the grounds of innovation, we are here in the city where so much that have has happened in so many profound ways. and it seems like
technology. it is a great way to make one of something, which is good. perhaps you want something that is custom just for you and you don't want something mass-produced. right now the ones you buy at home, it is qaeda militants and that sort of squeeze it out. there are other ways, there are liquid resins and powders and etc. you can go to a website and you can -- they have more expensive printers and you can get things printed in titanium. stainless steel. the quality is astounding. ge 3-d prints turbine blades for jet engines. there are some limits as to what you can do with the a 3-d printer, but not many. the question is simply how long is it going to take? it took 15 years to get from a dot matrix printer where we are now. so how long it will take for the photo-quality because i don't think it's going to be 15 years. in part because it shares the same mechanical technologies. but the interesting stuff gets into materials. right now, we can be one color and plastic. the next one, we will do two colors and plastic advocates better resolution than the maximum we will be three an
you cindy for the presentation and for the department of technology john. john, how are you? we have john from the department of technology and wanted to speak as well and welcome. >> thank you supervisors and thank you civil grand jury for your report and everyone attending. i want to take a few moments. i don't want to rehash the stuff said and commented on and you probably want a rich dialogue in question and answer period. i want to visit a few of points and give context to the conversation and like you i am fascinated by the title of the report and we should revisit a little bit and after being here for five years now where we have been and where we are coming to. in terms of deja vu let's reflect back where we were as individuals with technology or as an organization with the city. when i joined the city we didn't have a plan or a governance structure or coit and sun shet and talking about creating this structure and we were struggling how much money were we spending on it in the city? when i came here there wasn't a report? and so it has been a long and complex journey,
coming to. in terms of deja vu let's reflect back where we were as individuals with technology or as an organization with the city. when i joined the city we didn't have a plan or a governance structure or coit and sun shet and talking about creating this structure and we were struggling how much money were we spending on it in the city? when i came here there wasn't a report? and so it has been a long and complex journey, and i think it will continue in these hearings and going forward to be one of the challenges. i think we use technology on a daily basis and work and we are engaged and are we getting our money's worth and getting the service we want? and i wanted to revisit and my staff will tell you it's easy to hammer on the things not going well and i want to re-cap of the last five years and whether we're making progress in solving the problems and some of the projects are project related, operationally related and to your point president chiu and look back over the last four cio's and embedded in the organization and we need to talk about those in different conver
years ago, if we had sat down and talk about seniors and technology, a lot of people would have wondered why seniors would want to use computers, but that has shifted. over the next few years, as all of us move toward being seniors, we will not be wanting technology. we will be demanding it. the field is going to change, and more and more people are going to be here. so the ability to make technology accessible is there. those of us charged with doing this have a really important role. we have to be able to provide the tools for the technology in ways that the people can hear. i am happy to be your speaking with you because i think this is an incredibly important topic. this afternoon, there is a workshop on addressing multiple barriers for accessing technology, and it will be a brainstorming session where someone from my office and a couple of other people will be leading a discussion of what issues people run into and how you deal with them. i think it is a really important topic and i think it is probably one of the most important things people could be talking about now. for all of u
or six years. i feel like things change so quickly. the technology has changed things so rapidly that i think academia has a hard time keeping up and knowing what to tell young journalists to do. i am reading a slew of our lists saying, i want specialist's again. that is partly what is happening. the world is moving at such a rapid pace. >> we have a switch that with such a robust media industry for so long, the goal of academia as it applies to media was to protect quality and talk about best practices. whither the death of the media industry, and it is the death, the role has to switch to innovation to figuring out how to protect those values and other things we care about. that itself has to have some element of innovation and creativity. it cannot just be about best practices, these great stories we wrote, that sort of thing. >> if you want to become a documentary filmmaker, where do you learn how to do that? where do you go train? do you pick up your camera? what advice do you give to someone who says i want to be like bernardo ruiz. >> the scared straight documentary, the ex-con g
to create radical new energy storage technology. you know, way above what we have now. this is something very powerful, to be able to keep rovers going on the moon, in mars, things that could be useful, in your cell electric vehicles, something that just is a radical leap in new technology. but i don't want to go into a lot of detail on that. you'll hear more about nasa's efforts later. and what i'm going to do1r is ge a little more background on challenge-driven innovation. and i'm going to do that just by plaijerrizing some people because it makes it a loteasier for me. i want to look at this quote, prize is a very old -- an old idea that is surprisingly powerful in our modern society. this is by a study that by mckenzie and company, back in 2010. prize is a very old idea, very powerful in our modern society. surprisingly powerful in our modern society. mckenzie also said this, 32,000, in 2010, there were 32,000no competitions, competitions, prizes, awards. that's a big number. it could be bigger but it's a big number, for one year, 32,000 competitions happened. to continue on in myk
the line. as we get to our military partners i'd ask if there's other technologies that you think that you have that you want to share about that may be helpful as we start to get into fire season. please share those with us. ray, if you'd like to start. >> sure, thank you. first off, thanks for being here, it's my first time being here and i think it's an outstanding venue to meet the cooperating agencies and talk about policies and ways we can improve our response to the public that we serve. we look at title 10, title 32 resources in all aspects, all risk venue, like i said, not only aircraft but we utilize ltax for our agreements with la county fire, to mobilize fire engines to catalina island. we look at resources for debris cleaning, i found out there's a desalization battalion for fresh water, that's an i object credible resource for an earthquake. there's a variety of dod resources that cal fire can provide in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the new
or disabled have unfortunately historically been at the margins of new technologies when they are introduced. today, as broadband internet brings expanded opportunities in health care, education, and civic participation, projects like this one here in san francisco are critical to making sure that all communities have access to life changing technologies. [applause] high-speed internet connections make it possible for patients in rural areas to consult with medical specialists who are hundreds of miles away, for students to take online classes and universities across the country, and for governments to deliver services more efficiently and more easily to their constituents. for seniors, especially those whose families may live in different states or in different countries, broadband allows families to bond together in a way that telephone just never did. my own parents and all live in mexico city, and we are lucky because we both of broadband connections in our home. if a few weeks ago we got on skype. we set up the computer in our kitchen, and they set it up in their dining room but they in
invested in our information management systems. a lot of mobility technologies being rolled out across our organization we want to take that investment and leverage it across that network. they have over 200 locations, 4300 employees, this will wring our total work force up to 14,000 employees. we're really going to be able to have a lot more scale. we believe we really can drive margin improvement across their business. when you look at this business back in the late '90s, very successful business. it went through some real difficult times. but through those difficulties, they have a real strong brand. we're going to maintain that safety clean brand. we're going to maintain that network of the branches they have. and that will be a network. we can leverage and bring other services to their customers, particularly clean harbor's field services businesses, which is part of our emergency response business, as we talked about earlier. >> now, the conference call was interesting in that everyone seems really excited about the re-refining but there was some chatter about how the parts cleaning
cbs 5 forecast. >> thank you. >>> dna technology that can catch metal thieves. how it works and why it's not being used in the bay area. >> the jersey shore in ruins from sandy. a look at the catastrophe, the clean-up and why storm victims are turning on each other. ,, ,, ,,,,,,,, owner in san francisco. some und bronze >>> thomas the hippopotamus is in pieces but finally back with its owner in san francisco. somebody stole the statue in sutro heights four years ago. today police returned it to the rightful owner. >> i knew he would come back. i just knew it. i just felt that, first of all, nobody would say that it's scrap metal. >> now, if the thief had sold the statue to metal recyclers, that person could probably get a few hundred dollars for it. police found the hippo during a drug bust friday, made an arrest. the owner plans to weld thomas back together. >>> for years now we have told you about the rash of metal thefts just like that one and how much it ends up costing bay area cities utilities people. but there is dna-like technology that can catch a metal thief redhanded. cbs 5
the mayor came to us with a very precise question which was how can all of this data and technology help us to change and make the city more sustainable. if the go to copenhagen, traffic in the city looks like this. you had a lot of cars in the city center. now they have 30% or 50% every day. you have this bicycle idea. i do not know if we can put the audio. this will give your energy. despite changing the will you will save the energy. we can monitor what you are doing. they can collect information. all of these things you can share with your friends. you can put it on facebook. it is a very good way to increase the number of sites in copenhagen. instead collecting air miles, you collect green miles. this was the initial prototype. now we have these in cars. we are getting very close to its. hopefully, it will be here next year. >> come up on the stage. this is the vice president and director of the metropolitan policy program at the brookings institution. he will be joined by a bunch of other panelists for how far can innovations take our cities. >> thanks. while they get ready, i
and our technology companies, that we want to embrace technology as a way to announce this. so with that i am going to do the first tweet. tweeting. the new hash tag we would like everybody in the bay area to also utilize in their effort to go viral on this. there it goes. hopefully it goes on there. the hash tag sf super bowl! [applause] >> this is one example. facebook, google plus, instagram. we have all these wires in having people talk to us. what would they want and establish it, what kind of events that will help us be even more philanthropic about this. san francisco, santa clara, san jose, we want that effort to insight people to take this opportunity to join our nfl, join our 49ers, to join all of our sports crazy efforts and education efforts and all the things that we really reflect success in the san francisco bay area to join us in promoting this event and making sure that when we are ready to submit our bid to the nfl in may of next year that we will have created a community-based bay area wide effort to reflect on this wonderful opportunity. right now it is only an invitati
in common is we use technology -- in our cases, an online platform -- that actually lowers the barrier -- the barrier of entry so people across the social spectrum can engage. you do not need to have a second home in a fancy condo buildings in this city. you can have an extra count that you want to rent out, and you can find access to travelers from all over the world who also do not have the resources to spend money on a $200 hotel bill who want to say on your couch, and that is really democratizing travel, not just access to travel, but also access to the tourism economy that flourishes in the city. >> i just want to address the technology point really quickly. we try and emphasize the human aspect of this, whether it is on the website or whether it is through the iphone app. other people use a device that we built, that lets you share a car more conveniently by letting the richer unlock the car with their smartphone. even with that, we really try to connect the people who are sharing because a lot of people to accept rentals just with the kit and may never meet the people they are s
to affect major changes. >> what good reason is there for not embracing the best of what digital technology offers? i understand people get set in their ways, but we are talking about saving lives and cutting costs. i cannot imagine what the push by would be. the fax i get frustrated because i have seen what happens. -- >> i get frustrated because i have seen what happens. i said, how am i going to get this into reality? basically this is an appeal to consumers, to the public. what we need is this gutenberg moment in medicine. now people can read, because this is on your phone, and there is no reason why most people who can easily get up to speed will drive and no medicine. there are not enough physicians, and the establishment is too rigid to except these profound changes. >> as the patient have any role, any agency he or she can use to drive the future of medicine? tracks let's say you have high blood pressure, which almost 70 million americans have. you can track that better than ever before. it all you have to do is press start, and you are taking charge of an important diagnostic, and
can't have the boom and the bust. thenwhere it went big and then it was destroyed and then technology jobs went overseas. it's difficult to think about that and the repercussion when we could have a much more orderly transfer. but not the boom and bust. >> gavin: assume that president obama is re-elected. what should he think about going into the new year, taking the baton of sandy and new consciousness that hopefully is iowaawakened. what should be the top priority going into the second term? >> the top priority is talking again. your point was i think it was a good one that you started out with, no one is talking about. neither candidate is talking about it. we can't expect the american public to get on board if the leaders aren't talking about this. one thing that everyone is clear on, we will have storms of more intensity because of global warming. we will have more storms like this in the future because of global warming. one thing we have to do is start talking about it. second we really double down on theonthe innovation agenda. the president did a good job speaking about the s
better technology helps make you a better investor. with our revolutionary e-trade 360 dashboard you see exactly where your money is and what it's doing live. our e-trade pro platform offers powerful functionality that's still so usable you'll actually use it. and our mobile apps are the ultimate in wherever whenever investing. no matter what kind of investor you are, you'll find the technology to help you become a better one at e-trade. you'll find the technology to help you become a better one [ tires screech ] >> narrator: at the end of 2007, the fbi in montana, the secret service, and local police departments across the country see a connection in separate cases of cash-advance schemes nationwide. >> what seemed to be the pattern in all of those cases was that runners and handlers were being sent out to the far-flung areas of the country, and money was coming back to california. >> narrator: in august 2007, indianapolis police arrest a crew hitting banks in indiana. according to court documents, one of the fraudsters has gone into banks, posing as an out-of-town comedian who's been r
. california the center of technological innovation. how did it happen? there is a spirit there about the open mind, about learning. you take a country like south korea, that in the early 60s had a g.d.p. the same as most african countries and today is first world. >> gavin: what is foundation what is the most exciting that you're working on? what is are you passionate about. >> the most difficult, and most exciting for me, i have two foundations. one in africa where we work along side the governments of africa to deliver change to the people in seven different african countries. called the big footprint and then an organization of religious and cultural exchange where we work in some of the most difficult countries in the world where people are educated in the way they think and look at each other. >> gavin: you're not just bringing in resources you're using your own human resource to get involved, hands on, i imagine. >> i raise money for my foundation. i gave my own money to them and i go out to 20 different countries. it's a political after life. not for you governor, yet at any rate. >> g
to intro daus a lot of technology to help with the interoperatability of the civil military exercise. one of the main goals that we had for this was to allow our military a crisis response adaptive force package and opportunity to allow their training and certification in providing the most appropriate military expeditionary force for that scenario. one of the things that we realize in the military when we do these exercises in a foreign humanitarian response, that a lot of our military capabilities are not just for overseas foreign disasters but it also allows the military to be trained and certified to respond to local domestic disaster situations as well. i had mentioned that we had 22 nations participating in rimpac and this slide is a representation of the military and civilian partners that we had participating in this event. and we had many, many international partners and we had a lot of domestic partners: medical and military editionary partners as well. okay, this is our command and control slide. we took a lot of care to get this right. we wanted to make sure that we portra
something 70% full timers 20 years ago to now 70% part-timers. they are also using new technology that sets employee hours by tracking the ebb and flow of customer traffic. >> technology destroys jobs. >> reporter: for people like karen, part time is enough time for now. >> hoping this will be the start of the next big thing for me. >> reporter: so the jobs market is gaining momentum but many of those out there are paying less and less. meanwhile, the paragon outlet mall in livermore is in the process of hiring more than 2,000 part time and full-time workers. in livermore, elissa harrington, cbs 5. >> a new poll shows a dramatic shift in the way californians think about the death penalty. cbs 5 political reporter grace lee on how they may be ready to end capital punishment here. grace. >> reporter: records the field poll has been asking this questions for six decades typically they would vote no supporting the death penalty. right now at this time in fact cycle most people vote no if they're undecided. that's not what we're seeing in this poll. it surprised a lot of people including the fie
technology is here to explain. even when they say it's not it is always about money messa: so first let's take a look at the day's maet headlines. a rough-and-tumble week for stocks ending a on a quiet note. better than expected u.s. third quarter gdp data could knot offset worries about corporate earnings the dow eked out a gain of three points. good year was one of the biggest losers wi shares tumbling more than 10%. the tire-maker missed third quarter estimates driven by weakness in europe. one bright spot was expedia. shar soared 15%. they posted strong third quarter earnings fueled by a sharp rise in hotel bookings. >>> now to our top story. some people are calling it "frankenstorm". others call it a nor'easter-cane combination hurricane, nor'easter snowstorm or nightmare. if you live on the east coast you call it scary. hurricane sandy is making its way up the eastern seaboard. it may hit critical refineries that process 3.1 million barrels of oil per day. you know what that means. gas prices could go right back up. patrick dehaan from gasbuddy.com joins me with more on this one.
that technology was invented by somebody and it was invented by scientists that put together an idea and figured out how to make it work. >> that's true. we see innovation as the practical expression of imagination where you turn ideas into reality. and we're all about that here at the tech museum of innovation. >> what are some of the other exhibits? >> well, if you come to the tech museum you may want to get tickets to "mythbusters" an amazing exhibit. you can see the blueprints and if you get more wet whether you walk on run through the rain. you can play with react table where you move blocks around to may musical compositions and come down to our hands on on science workshop and build your own plane. >> that's one of the really neat things down here is not just sitting here in a class and learning about science but you get to do some real hands on stuff so you can understand how things work. >> it's true. you know, bay area science festival is all about unleashing your inyour scientists and tech museum. we want to help unleash your inner science. >> reporter: totally for geeks like me but i
to an oilfield where companies like chevron having drilling for more than 60 years. but new technology would allow that drilling to expand to places where the oil lies much deeper. 14billion barrels of oil reserves could now finally be accessible in the hills and valleys beyond san ard doe in an area known as the monterey shale. >> these are source rocks for oil and gas. >> reporter: this physicist says shale oil is harder to harvest. you need go down and out horizontally in a technique called fracking. >> now we have technology, enabling technologies, that allow these reservoirs to be produced economically. >> reporter: with oil at almost $90 a barrel, he predicts things are about to change. fast. >> there's just a lot more activity and a lot of that activity is in places where there hasn't been much for a long period of time. >> reporter: in monterey county oil prospectors are knock on the doors of landowners trying to buy up leases. >> now all of a sudden, the people that drilled for oil are more interested in going out and getting these mineral rights for property owners. >> reporter: th
. sector analysis is particularly important technology. people confuse this gigantic group of stocks which comprises more than 15% of the s & p 500 constantly. tech is a whole group of markets. infrastructure stocks, assemblers, each have a separate growth rate. here i like to look at the earnings per share growth rate of the companies i follow versus the individual prices of the sector. the sector growth rate doesn't work even though people keep trying to use it. cloud stocks, for example, are highly valued. price rates to growth earnings are extreme. that means there's no room for error, a chink that could upset the growth rate. in 2011 one of my favorite cloud stocks -- it got pancaked and stayed ugly for a long time. why? because it underperformed its portion of the technology sector even as its growth rate would have been outstanding for say a personal computer-related stock or a disc drive, a semiconductor or cell phone company. these days knowing what the sector is isn't enough. you need to know the subsector. you need to know how your company stacks up against the growth rate of th
and even up to 50% more than leading sonic technology brushes for a superior clean. oral-b power brushes. go to oralb.com for the latest offers. [ tires screech ] >> narrator: 2011, on the coast of malaysia, a man named jim eberhart posts an online ad selling his 58-foot yacht -- the infinity. allegedly, no stranger to making a sales pitch, eberhart tells prospective buyers the boat is perfect for cruising the world. when it was built, he says, there was no budget. what buyers might not know is that there's a reason money was once no object. richard ryan, supervisory special agent with the los angeles fbi, says eberhart ran a sham internet-video company that allegedly bilked investors out of millions, then fled the country. >> mr. eberhart's been a fugitive from justice. the investigation shows that he did wire money to hong kong and then, subsequently, singapore, and this could be the way that mr. eberhart has been facilitating his lifestyle as a fugitive. >> narrator: now on the run for more than a decade, eberhart seems to be thumbing his nose at authorities. he's selling the yacht un
the best and i am short the rest. sector analysis is particularly important technology. people confuse this gigantic group of stocks which comprises more than 15% of the s & p 500 constantly. tack is a grotech is a whole gr markets. infrastructure stocks, aaccept blers, each have a separate growth rate. here i like to look at the earnings per share growth rate of the companies i follow versus the individual prices of the sector. the sector growth rate doesn't work even though people keep trying to use it. cloud stocks, for example, are highly valued. price rates to growth earnings are extreme. that means there's no room for error, a chunk that could upset the growth rate. in 2011 one of my favorite cloud stocks -- it got pancaked and stayed ugly for a long time. why? because it underperformed its portion of the technology sector even as its growth rate would have been outstanding for say a personal computer-related stock or a disc drive, a semiconductor or cell phone company. these days knowing what the sector is isn't enough. you need to note sub sector. you need to know how your comp
the radio. but with the military this is a whole new set of radio frequencies, radio technology, even before the planning we didn't know what they had. it took us several planning opportunities and meetings to flush through some of that information and one of the biggest take aways for us, as a city we're required to have a tactical interoperatable communications plan. it describes how you interoperate in an emergency or an event within the city as well as regional partners. we don't have that with military and i think that's one of the biggest take aways, we need to really flesh out a document so we have captured who our contacts are, what technology they are going to bring to the table and start that initial planning from the get-go. we also had some technical challenges with land mobile radio. you know, we have the coverage issues, but we were stationed at the san francisco police department command van, i had some very sharp people there who were able to work through a lot of those interoperatability issues so a huge thank you to the police department and also the fire department and
of technology and our city administrator. but ultimately working with our department of public works and mohammed at the helm, making sure this got done on time within budget, having the architects and engineers under [speaker not understood] working with the expert laboratory folks from dph and the hiv clinic to make sure that we did it right. because the laboratories have to meet federal standards. but i think also a great kudos has to happen to our partners, both locally, regionally, and the federal government. we could not have done this without the 9-1/2 million dollars of recovery monies that we got through the federal government. we have herb schultz here from the department of human services federal government. they've been really at the forefront with us. certainly dan bernel representing leader pelosi. she has been really a stalwart fighter. when everybody was cutting funds, she preserved that money for us. and, of course, i've got to put out a big, big thanks to president obama because without that recovery money, we wouldn't be here talking about this today. so, thank you
and microsoft that used that technology. this technology helps ensure things like mobile phone antennas all work together. >>> the price tag for keeping the plant shut down climbed to $317 million. they spent $96 million on repairs and inspection and $221 to purchase replacement power. . >>> there is a hot line for residents of treasure island to call in response to concerns about a toxic clean up project. they set up the hot line after hearing complaints about uncovered work trucks driven on to the liland and there -- to the island. >>> for the second time in two days we are hearing from a shark attack survivor who says they were able to punch the shark away. he came face to face with a tiger shark last week. she says she made used of her tae kwon do and punched the shark twice. >> heard kind of like noise. people yelling, like hollywood, you know, you see the big jaws come at you. >> she needed 60-70 stitches for scratches. on tuesday a surfer survived a shark attack. >>> two tax measures that would benefit schools, prop 30 and 38. the governor says voters are facing a choice. approve the tax
-mail, the intersection of technology and privacy was paid long ago. back when the internet was known as the information superhighway. but now it seems the road is wide open, and wherever it leads, you're not only being watched, you're being photographed. >> it was very obvious that there was something different about that police car. >> reporter: mike had heard about the san leandro police department's license plate scanner. then one day he saw for himself the specially equipped car and began to wonder. he asked for public records and photos. >> i requested not just information about the cars that have been photographed by the license plate scanner, i also requested details about how many records they had gathered since the system started being used. >> reporter: to mike's surprise, over the encounters of two years, police had taken about 120 pictures of him and his car. an average of one a week. one clearly shows where he is. at home. but to mike, all of them show disturbly personal information. >> in at least one of those pictures, you can very clearly identify me getting out of the car with my two d
guess since those days there has been one important improvement, one technological improvement, that we use expensively to create interoperatability and that is ip networks built of sdparate systems and the network allows us to operate. as you see from our demonstration as you checked in this morning, as you ridge stered this morning, san francisco talking it oakland, talking to this ship, talking over cellular, talking across and with different networks. the challenge for interoperatability is beginning to be met, i would say, the challenge for interoperatability at the same time is about to get much greater. we as a nation are about to embark on the most ambitous, most challenging communications endeavor that we have ever attempted, which is the creating of purse net, the public safety broad band or 4g network. and with that brings the promise of new challenges for sure in interoperatability and new capabilities that we have never had before. in fact, no other country is as far along as we are, even though we're just starting. what we see is the opportunity there to interoperate i
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 199 (some duplicates have been removed)